“And everything we do, we are responsible”: Hudbay Minerals

IMG_0294

Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona. Picture: Mona Polacca

LEA LA VERSIÓN EN ESPAÑOL ABAJO

Eight weeks ago, we started a cycle of posts on the struggles and alternatives to defend the Water of the Abya-Yala and the Turtle Island. Today, inspired by the documentary Flin Flon Flim Flam (2015) by John Dougherty (InvestigateMedia), we would like to share a personal account of Grandmother Mona Polacca, co-secretariat of the Indigenous World Forum on Water and Peace, and take a moment to reflect upon the intentions of our blog in the Information Era.

bio-pic-2015mona

Gradmother Mona Polacca

THE STORY

Mona Polacca is a Havasupai/Hopi/Tewa Elder from Arizona (see http://www.grandmotherscouncil.org/who-we-are/grandmother-mona-polacca). When we were writing this post, we asked for her guidance and she sent us this powerful story. Thank you, Mona!

…I was on a drive through southern Arizona. I was commenting to my friend, Austin Nunez (the Chairman of the Wa:K Community AKA San Xavier District of the Tohono O’odham Nation) how I was feeling the spirit and heart of the land as we were driving through the desert. I had mentioned that I needed to take pictures because I had never been to this area before yet, felt de-javu, that I had been there in my dream. I also had the thought that, “maybe this will be the only time I will see this place like this!

I thought he didn’t hear me since he kept driving and I was trying to take pictures while we were moving, you know how that goes! Anyway, he suddenly pulled off the road at a viewpoint looking down across the valley and mountains. He then told me about the Rosemont Mine, and that this landscape I was admiring would soon be the largest open-pit copper mine in the western hemisphere. I was saddened. I asked him, “What are you doing about it?”. He responded, “We are opposed to it, and we are fighting to stop it”.

A few days later, I drove there on my way to the Apache Springs Horse Ranch, which is located near the proposed Rosemont site and the Cienega Springs mentioned in the film. That’s when I noticed this amazing mountain range, Santa Rita Mountains in the distance, there was an area that had snowcaps, so “beautiful” I thought, “must take a picture”. I tried, while I was driving – a big “no no”, especially when driving on a narrow winding road!! I decided to wait until I could turn off the road and stop, and decided that if the mountains were no longer in view, I could accept that, after all I had the memory stored where I will always have it with me. So, when I came to the road I had to take to the horse ranch, as I drove to the ranch there before me was the mountains, the part that had the snowcaps! I was over-whelmed by what I saw! I cried and said, “You are a guardian spirit woman mountain, they cannot destroy you”! I continued my drive to the ranch, which turned out to be sitting below this special part of the mountain. I asked the owners of the ranch, “Do you know that that mountain is very sacred?” they said, “Yes, and we are doing everything we can to take care of the space she has given us to use”. I was happy to know that, I thought, these would be supporters and/or defenders of the Santa Rita Mountains from the Hudbay mining proposal.

While at the ranch, I made a wonderful relationship of unconditional love and acceptance with a horse named Cochise. I made a promise to him and all the other horses that I would make prayers for protection of their home. And so it is – I am making prayers in that way…

FLIN FLON FLIM FLAM

At the convergence of damage and hope, Flin Flon Flim Flam weaves together interviews and facts about four different mining projects orchestrated by the Canadian-based Transnational Company Hudbay Minerals: Mine 777, and Reed Mine in the Grass River Provincial Park (Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada), El Estor, Lote 8, and Vigil’s Mine in Maya Q’ech’i territory (Guatemala), Constancia Mine in Uchucarco (Chumbivilcus Province, Perú), and the Rosemont Project in the sacred Santa Rita Mountains (Arizona, US).

WATCH Flin Flon Flim Flam => https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7aacPtEI8s&feature=youtu.be 

The facts and statements collected in the movie are both disturbing and encouraging, thus our post today would like to acknowledge the resourcefulness and bravery of its protagonists. Despite the fact that Flin Flon’s aquifer and soil are full of metal concentrations—a consequence of the 85 years of irresponsible operations by Hudbay Minerals—Mathias Colomb Cree Nation and Chief Arten Dumas are fighting back! Although the Peruvian nation-state police are violently repressing the Uchucarco community protests, Quechua advocates are denouncing the damage of heavy traffic on the road, copper dust in the air, and the failure of the company in fulfilling job quotas. In Toronto, Hudbay Minerals is being sued by Angelica Choc, German Chub, and eleven women from the Q’eqch’i nation. By holding a Canadian company accountable for the acts of an overseas subsidiary, this lawsuit is endeavouring to set a precedent for future incidences (read article in the New York Times).

Finally, despite the 1872 General Mining Law, which encourages companies such as Hudbay Minerals to continue destroying the land in Arizona and the rest of the USA, a coalition between the City of Tucson, the Pima County, the Yaqui Nation, the Tohono O’odham Nation, and several Congressional representatives, are together protecting the Santa Rita Mountains, the heart of the Cienaga Springs, a habitat of twelve endangered species such as the wild jaguar and the ocelotl (read http://www.rosemontminetruth.com).

We have borrowed the title of our post, “And everything we do, we are responsible”, from the Hudbay Minerals’ President and CEO David Garofalo, whose words in the documentary are incongruous with the actions of his company. By contrasting Garofalo’s speech with Hudbay Minerals’ actions, Flin Flon Flim Flam reminds us of the power of resistance in subverting discourses.

Flin Flon Flim Flam is both asking for action and reflection: action to stop these four projects (especially Rosemont, which has not yet started); and reflection on the words and the actions of its protagonists, including our own, as contemporaries. Beyond the tired categories of Third and First World, the documentary shows how the mining industry is affecting indigenous and local communities regardless of the location—in Canada, USA, Peru or Guatemala. Corruption, impunity, and lack of regulation are present in all of these scenarios. As a response, the documentary underlines how decisive intercultural initiatives can be. Ray Carroll, Pima County’s AZ Supervisor, explains his county’s major concern:

Why sell tomorrow to pay for today, is the opinion of most of the people that I represent.

We want to believe that our blog is a way of action, and sharing information in Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media with our friends and family are ways of action, too! Despite the amount of violence and damage caused by mining projects and reproduced by the mass media and news, in acknowledging indigenous and local organization who are defending Water, we are part of a global stream of consciousness concerned with Water for future generations.

Thus, we hope you share with us your comments, and spread these posts among your friends and family. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like to publish news related to water in your community.

Until next week!

~~~

“De todo lo que hacemos, nosotros somos los responsables”: Hudbay Minerals

IMG_0293

Las montañas de Santa Rita a lo lejos. Foto: Mona Polacca

Ocho semanas atrás comenzamos este ciclo de notas sobre problemáticas y alternativas para defender el agua en la Isla Tortuga (Norteamérica) y el Abya-Yala (América toda, la tierra en plena madurez Tule-Guna). Hoy, inspirados en el documental Flin Flon Flim Flam (2015) dirigido por John Dougherty (InvestigateMedia), queremos compartirles una historia personal de la abuela Mona Polacca, co-secretaria del Foro Indígena Mundial Sobre el Agua y la Paz, y hacer una pausa para visualizar la intención de este blog en la Era de la Información.

LA HISTORIA

Mona Polacca es guía espiritual de las naciones Havasupai/Hopi/Tewa de Arizona (ver http://www.grandmotherscouncil.org/who-we-are/grandmother-mona-polacca). Cuando estábamos escribiendo esta entrada, le pedimos su consejo, y ella nos envió la historia que copiamos a continuación. ¡Gracias, Mona!

… Yo estaba viajando por el sur de Arizona. Le estaba comentando a mi amigo Austin Nuñez, el presidente de la comunidad Wa:K AKA del Distrito de San Xavier de la Nación Tohono O’odham, cómo estaba sintiendo el corazón y el espíritu de esa tierra mientras atravesábamos el desierto. Yo había dicho que necesitaba tomar fotos porque nunca había estado en esta área antes, sentía como dejavu, como si yo hubiera estado allí en mi sueño. También tenía el pensamiento: “¡Tal vez esta será la única vez que vea este lugar así!”

Pensé que no me había escuchado porque él continuó manejando y yo estaba tratando de tomar fotos mientras nos movíamos, ¡tú sabes cómo es eso! En fin, de pronto él se salió de la carretera y paró en un mirador desde donde se veían las montañas y el valle. Entonces me habló sobre la Mina Rosemont, y que ese paisaje que yo estaba admirando pronto sería la mina de cobre a cielo abierto más grande en el hemisferio occidental. Yo me puse triste. Le pregunté: “¿Qué están haciendo ustedes?”. Él me respondió: “Estamos en contra, y estamos luchando para detenerlo.”

Unos días después, pasé por allí de camino al rancho de caballos Apache Springs, el cual está ubicado cerca del sitio propuesto para la mina, y también de Cienaga Springs, el cual mencionan en la película [Flin Flon Flim Flam, ver abajo]. Ahí fue cuando caí en cuenta de esta maravillosa cadena montañosa, las montañas de Santa Rita en la distancia, había una área con casquetes de nieve, “¡qué hermoso!”, pensé, “tengo que tomar una foto”. Traté mientras estaba manejando, pero “no, no”, sobre todo en una angosta y ventosa carretera. Decidí esperar hasta que pudiera parar, y si las montañas no estaban entonces en el panorama, tendría que aceptarlo, pues después de todo tenía la memoria guardada y siempre las tendría conmigo. Entonces cuando llegué a la carretera que tenía que tomar, mientras manejaba hacia el rancho de caballos, ahí estaban ante mí las montañas, ¡la parte que tenía los casquetes de hielo! ¡Yo estaba abrumada por lo que veía! Lloré y dije: “Tú eres guardián, mujer espíritu de la Montaña, ¡ellos no pueden destruirte!” Continué manejando hacia el rancho, el que terminó ubicado justo debajo de esa parte especial de la montaña. Les pregunté a los dueños del rancho: “¿Ustedes saben que esta montaña es sagrada?”. Ellos dijeron: “Sí, y estamos haciendo todo lo que podemos para cuidar el espacio que ella nos ha permitido usar”. Yo estaba feliz de saberlo, y pensé, “ellos deben ser defensores de las montañas de Santa Rita contra el proyecto minero de Hudbay”.

Cuando estaba en el rancho, hice una relación maravillosa de amor incondicional y aceptación con un caballo llamado Cochise. Le hice una promesa a él y a todos los otros caballos, que yo haría oraciones para proteger su casa. Y así es, estoy haciendo oraciones hacia esa dirección…

FLIN FLON FLIM FLAM

En la convergencia entre el daño y la esperanza, Flin Flon Flim Flam teje entrevistas y hechos relacionados con cuatro proyectos mineros orquestados por la compañía transnacional con base en Canadá Hudbay Minerals: la mina 777 y la mina Reed en el Parque Estatal Grass River (Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada), las minas de El Estor, Lote 8 y Vigil en territorio Maya Q’ech’i (Guatemala), la de mina de Constancia en Uchucarco (Provincia de Chumbivilcus, Perú), y el proyecto Rosemont en las montañas sagradas de Santa Rita (Arizona, US).

VER Flin Flon Flim Flam (español, inglés, quechua y q’eqch’i) => https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7aacPtEI8s&feature=youtu.be 

 

Hoy hemos prestado el título de nuestro post, “De todo lo que hacemos, nosotros somos los responsables”, del presidente y director ejecutivo de Hudbay Minerals, David Garofalo, cuyas palabras en el documental son incongruentes con las acciones de su compañía. Al contrastar el discurso de Garofalo con las acciones de Hudbay Minerals,  Flin Flon Flim Flam nos recuerda la fuerza de subvertir los discursos.

Este documental nos invita al mismo tiempo a actuar y a reflexionar: actuar en contra de estos cuatro proyectos (especialmente el de la mina Rosemont, la cual no ha comenzado aun), y a reflexionar sobre las palabras y los actos de sus protagonistas, incluidos nosotros mismos como contemporáneos de estas problemáticas. Más allá de las desgastadas categorías de Primer y Tercer mundo, el documental demuestra cómo la industria extractiva está afectando comunidades campesinas, indígenas y locales igual en Canadá que en Estados Unidos, Perú o Guatemala. Corrupción, impunidad, y falta de regulación están presentes en todos estos escenarios. Como respuesta, el documental subraya lo decisivas que pueden llegar a ser las iniciativas interculturales. Ray Carroll, Supervisor del condado de Pima, explica la mayor preocupación de su condado:

Para qué vender el mañana para pagar el hoy, esa es la opinión de la mayoría de la gente que yo represento.

Nosotros creemos que este blog es una forma de acción, y compartir en Facebook, Twitter o cualquier otra red social, con nuestros amigos y nuestra familia ¡son formas de acción! Apesar de la cantidad de violencia y daño causados por los proyectos mineros, al reconocer las organizaciones locales e indígenas que defienden el agua, estamos siendo parte de una corriente global de conciencia, dispuesta a proteger el agua para las futuras generaciones.

Estaremos esperando sus comentarios. ¡Pasen la voz entre amigos y familia!

No duden en contactarnos si quisieran publicar alguna noticia/alternativa/iniciativa relacionada con el agua de su comunidad.

¡Hasta la próxima semana!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: